Really F**king Simple Solutions to Spotify’s Explicit Tagging Problem

Spotify button imageThe solution(s) for this are so simple that it’s [email protected]!#ing painful.

I blogged a few years ago about how Spotify’s tagging of explicit tracks is hit-and-miss – with some tracks that are explicit not tagged as such, and vice versa – and the situation hasn’t improved much since then. As a parent with young kids who wants to play music around the house but wants to avoid subjecting them to accidental swearing, my options are a) only playing music/playlists/albums that I know from memory are 100% swearing-free, or b) simply don’t use Spotify. I don’t think Spotify would like the latter option much, especially if a lot of people followed suit.

Spotify obviously cares about catering to families – they have a Premium option aimed at families specifically (h/t to Pritesh Patel for this discovery – who’s had similar frustrations to me). So it seems counter-intuitive to me that they consider families a target audience but won’t do all that they can to make it a family-friendly offering.

There’s definitely something already in place, as some tracks are tagged as explicit. A look at The National’s Trouble Will Find Me shows that all the explicit tracks are tagged correctly (3 out of 13), which is great. But look at The National’s more recent offering – Sleep Well Beast – and nothing’s tagged, however track 3 (“Walk It Back”) contains the word “f*ck” at least 4 times. You could argue that it’s not a popular song, but it’s had nearly 4 million plays on Spotify (as I type this), so that’s not really true.

Example on Spotify of The National screenshot
Example of how it looks on Spotify – notice how “I Need My Girl” is (correctly) tagged while “Walk It Back” isn’t tagged at all

The problem with a half-hearted approach is that you assume it’s right (especially when implemented by a company of Spotify’s size and scale) so you think if something’s marked as explicit then it is, and if it isn’t then it isn’t. If there was no explicit tagging in the first place then you know you’d have to be careful – but with incorrect tagging, you risk assuming everything is tagged correctly (and getting caught out when it isn’t).

Of course that’s just one example of one track from one album by one band… so I asked some Twitter friends for more. Here’s what I got back, plus a few more I’ve found of my own accord in the past:

I appreciate that it’s unfair of me to suggest that Spotify doesn’t care. On the one hand, it could be something that they’ve completely overlooked. On the other hand, it could be the one thing keeping Spotify’s developers up all night. Who knows.

So what can be done? Here’s a few suggestions that I can think of for starters…

Leverage Spotify’s partnership with Genius further…

Spotify is already partnered with Genius (and SoundHound, I’ve just found out while researching and typing this) to be able to show lyrics while listening to a song. Presumably there is an API in place that Spotify is using, which feeds Genius’ lyrics for a song into Spotify.

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Cardiff SEO Meet is Looking for a New Venue for 2018!

Cardiff SEO Meet (alt logo)New year, new venue. After three events in 2017 at Tramshed Tech, it’s time for a change… Cardiff SEO Meet is looking for a new venue for its events in 2018 and beyond. I have somewhere in mind, but I’d like to keep options open and get a ton of suggestions to consider.

Can you help? Do you know of anywhere suitable? Are you a venue owner who can provide a venue? Here’s our criteria:

  • Within 10 mins walk from Cardiff Central railway station
  • Reliable, free WiFi – ideally with no catches (e.g. you don’t have to subscribe to their mailing list or follow them on social media, etc.)
  • Accessible between 5:30pm-ish & 9:30pm-ish on the night, to set up and pack by
  • 50-100 capacity
  • Their own screen/projector setup

And nice-to-haves, although by no means deal-breakers if not available:

  • Food and drink available to buy (negating the need for a caterer – although happy to source externally if required)
  • PA and mic provided (if required, depending on whether or not the venue needs it)
  • Parking outside or nearby (free evening parking an added bonus)

Something like a function room in a bar would probably be our best fit, however another possibility could be an office premises, say if they also host events there… So long as the above criteria are met really.

We have sponsors, so there’s a budget, meaning that the venue hire doesn’t necessarily have to be free/cheap… however if the venue is open to becoming an event sponsor in return for a reduced rate then that’d be fab. Perks include a logo and a link on the Meetup group and on the event page of each event (here’s an example of an old event page), mentions in tweets before/during/after the event, mentions/links in the emails that go out to meetup subscribers (380+ people as I type this), and probably a whole bunch of other stuff. There’s also the fact that the venue will be seen by 30-50 people each time (I’m hoping to ramp this up next year) – one of our past venues commented that everyone who came to the event was a fresh face who had never visited before, so 30-50 new customers essentially.

Let me know! You can leave a comment below, email me, tweet me or @CardiffSEOMeet, or sign up to the Meetup group and message me on there. Cheers!

4 Quick Twitter Tips for Award Ceremonies

Award ceremony photoI’m not a social media consultant, nor someone who’s ever run social media for an event such as an award ceremony. However I’m a heavy Twitter user and I’ve seen a ton of award ceremonies – new or old, big or small, hardly known or well-established – making what I’d consider to be major mistakes when tweeting about their award ceremony during the event itself.

Trying to run social media while running an event can be tricky, I get that (I know from my own experiences)… Unless of course you have someone else in the role doing it, or you make sure to dedicate some time during the night to doing the necessary tasks yourself. Whatever the case, here’s my tips on how award ceremony events can make a huge (yet simple) difference on the tweeting front…

1) Make the Twitter handle & hashtag (really) obvious on the night

This is the head-slappingly simple one which makes me want to cry when award ceremonies don’t get it right. Either they won’t actively promote their hashtag (missed opportunity!) or there’ll be confusion as to what the hashtag actually is, resulting in either a mix of hashtags being used (some of which will be incorrect) or potential tweeters abstaining from using a hashtag – or tweeting altogether.

Put your Twitter handle and hashtag everywhere. And I mean everywhere. Put it on the website; put it in Twitter profile bio; put it on the promotional literature that goes on the tables such as the ceremony booklet/list of nominees; put it on the banners and signage; put it on the big screens; put it everywhere. And if you put it on the screens, don’t just show it briefly – make sure that it’s visible at all times, whether it’s a slide deck, a series of videos or a mix of media. It’s bound to result in a higher take-up of hashtag/handle usage when people tweet their experience, whether it’s about the people they’re with, the food & drink, or who the winners are.

Speaking of tweeting about the winners…

2) Make sure you tweet the winners (i.e. don’t rely on others to do it)

I’ve seen this happen more than once, and it’s weird: when the official Twitter handle of the award ceremony only RTs other people tweeting about the event (such as the attendees) but doesn’t actually tweet anything itself. It’s bizarre. It also means that they don’t tweet the winners as they’re announced. Perhaps they’re too busy, and/or perhaps they’re simply relying on the attendees doing it for them – after all, there’s usually at least one person who’ll go to the effort of tweeting the names of the winners of every category. But what if that doesn’t happen? I was at an award ceremony a while back where people – neither the attendees nor the organisers themselves – were tweeting the winners, resulting in people tweeting saying “…So who won the [x] category?” – especially those who couldn’t attend, like myself. It was a complete mess.

So take the time and effort to tweet each winner as-and-when they’re announced, complete with their Twitter handle, maybe a photo of them grabbing the award, and – of course – the hashtag. Be the official spokesperson for yourself, as it is meant to be.

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Getting the Most from Yoast – My Cardiff WordPress Talk

Cardiff WordPress Prisma pic
Yesterday I did a talk at Cardiff WordPress, my first speaking gig in close to a year (you can see a list of all my past speaking gigs here).

Held at the fabulous Tramshed Tech (where Cardiff SEO Meet is also held!), I presented in front of 20+ WordPress designers & developers as well as fellow digital marketers.

My talk? Getting the Most from Yoast, giving details and insight into the Yoast SEO plugin, showcasing its features and settings, explaining how and why certain parts of it affect your website’s SEO, and how to make sure you’re setting it up to get the most out of it.

It was a good, attentive group, who were a pleasure to present to. After my talk, there was a general roundtable Q&A session where individuals could field their WordPress problems to the group, which was pretty cool. We also talked about SEO a bit more (something that I ain’t complaining about)!

Here are the slides, which I submitted to Speaker Deck (because they looked terrible when uploaded to SlideShare):

[Image credit – Davey Brown via Twitter (and then run through Prisma)]

Why I Turned Down a Potentially Huge Sponsor for Cardiff SEO Meet

Cardiff SEO Meet crowd photo
Sponsorship for Cardiff SEO Meet isn’t really that big a thing. For the first three events, there weren’t any sponsors – I paid for it myself (well, Morgan Online Marketing paid for it, technically). But then our first venue was a bar, where people could buy their own food and drink if they wanted to. When we moved venues to somewhere where I needed to provide my own food and drink, the costs shot up. I wanted to keep the entry fee free, so I couldn’t recoup money that way. Therefore I knew that I’d need sponsors to help cover those costs, and a few people I know were happy to oblige.

It’s simple: for £100, your sponsorship goes towards food & drink costs. In return, you get a link from the Meetup group and event page, a mention in the announcement email that goes to all of the group’s members, various tweet ‘shout-outs’ before and after the event, your logo on the absolutely massive screen, and a couple of shout-outs/thank you’s at the event. In my eyes, that’s a pretty decent deal. We get about 40-50 people to each event, which isn’t especially a huge number, but it’s not tiny either. The Meetup group has over 300 members as well.

So far, most of our sponsors have been local (and local-ish) freelancers, agencies and fellow event organisers – I’ll list them here, as I want to thank them again for their support to date: HQ SEO, Cardiff Digital, Xanthe Studios, All Things Web® and Traffic Jam Media (and not forgetting Tramshed Tech for being our venue sponsor). I casually joked with someone though that it’d be awesome if one of the big global SEO software providers expressed interest in becoming a sponsor.

Weirdly enough, a few days later… one of the big global SEO software providers expressed interest in becoming a sponsor. They sponsor a lot of the bigger events worldwide, and (somehow) my piddly little meetup had gotten onto their radar. I was elated.

But I ended up turning them down.

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