Events

Getting the Most from Yoast – My Cardiff WordPress Talk

Cardiff WordPress Prisma pic
Yesterday I did a talk at Cardiff WordPress, my first speaking gig in close to a year (you can see a list of all my past speaking gigs here).

Held at the fabulous Tramshed Tech (where Cardiff SEO Meet is also held!), I presented in front of 20+ WordPress designers & developers as well as fellow digital marketers.

My talk? Getting the Most from Yoast, giving details and insight into the Yoast SEO plugin, showcasing its features and settings, explaining how and why certain parts of it affect your website’s SEO, and how to make sure you’re setting it up to get the most out of it.

It was a good, attentive group, who were a pleasure to present to. After my talk, there was a general roundtable Q&A session where individuals could field their WordPress problems to the group, which was pretty cool. We also talked about SEO a bit more (something that I ain’t complaining about)!

Here are the slides, which I submitted to Speaker Deck (because they looked terrible when uploaded to SlideShare):

[Image credit – Davey Brown via Twitter (and then run through Prisma)]

Why I Turned Down a Potentially Huge Sponsor for Cardiff SEO Meet

Cardiff SEO Meet crowd photo
Sponsorship for Cardiff SEO Meet isn’t really that big a thing. For the first three events, there weren’t any sponsors – I paid for it myself (well, Morgan Online Marketing paid for it, technically). But then our first venue was a bar, where people could buy their own food and drink if they wanted to. When we moved venues to somewhere where I needed to provide my own food and drink, the costs shot up. I wanted to keep the entry fee free, so I couldn’t recoup money that way. Therefore I knew that I’d need sponsors to help cover those costs, and a few people I know were happy to oblige.

It’s simple: for £100, your sponsorship goes towards food & drink costs. In return, you get a link from the Meetup group and event page, a mention in the announcement email that goes to all of the group’s members, various tweet ‘shout-outs’ before and after the event, your logo on the absolutely massive screen, and a couple of shout-outs/thank you’s at the event. In my eyes, that’s a pretty decent deal. We get about 40-50 people to each event, which isn’t especially a huge number, but it’s not tiny either. The Meetup group has over 300 members as well.

So far, most of our sponsors have been local (and local-ish) freelancers, agencies and fellow event organisers – I’ll list them here, as I want to thank them again for their support to date: HQ SEO, Cardiff Digital, Xanthe Studios, All Things Web® and Traffic Jam Media (and not forgetting Tramshed Tech for being our venue sponsor). I casually joked with someone though that it’d be awesome if one of the big global SEO software providers expressed interest in becoming a sponsor.

Weirdly enough, a few days later… one of the big global SEO software providers expressed interest in becoming a sponsor. They sponsor a lot of the bigger events worldwide, and (somehow) my piddly little meetup had gotten onto their radar. I was elated.

But I ended up turning them down.

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24 Hours of Selfies: My Challenge for Red Nose Day 2017

Red Nose Day selfie photo
It’s a bit short notice (given that it’s only two days away!), but I’ve decided to set myself a challenge for Red Nose Day 2017:

On Friday 24th March 2017, I’ll take a selfie with everyone that I speak to face-to-face (regardless of whether I know them or not!)* and tweet the pics via my Twitter (@steviephil) using the hashtag #steviephilselfie.

* Obviously people can opt out and stuff (plus there’s a few other ‘rules’), but hopefully people will want to get involved.

I had the idea for this ages ago, and RND seems like the perfect opportunity to give it a go. I should be working at Welsh ICE (my coworking space) on the day, so hopefully I’ll have plenty of people to interact (and take selfies) with. If I’m not then it’s gonna be pretty lame, as I’ll probably work from home and I’ll only end up doing selfies with my family, haha… So fingers-crossed I’m at ICE, eh!

If you’d like to sponsor me (please do!), you can do so via my dedicated RND Giving page: https://my.rednoseday.com/sponsor/steviephilselfie. Even if it’s just a couple of quid, it’ll all make a difference. Thank you in advance.

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The 3 Biggest Takeaways from Kelvin Newman’s Reddit AMA

Yesterday, the mighty Kelvin Newman (@kelvinnewman) of brightonSEO fame did an Ask Me Anything on Reddit.

Kelvin Newman's AMA on Reddit screenshot
I’m a big fan of Kelvin, not only because he runs an incredible conference and has been crazy enough to let me speak at it (not just once, but twice), but because he’s a great guy as well. And as an SEO event organiser myself, I’m always curious to know the thinking behind brightonSEO, how he runs the event and where he wants to take it in the future.

To be honest, whether you’re an event organiser yourself, or just a big fan of brightonSEO (who isn’t?), it’s probably worth reading the whole AMA from start to finish, as there are tips and insights sprinkled throughout. But if you’re a busy guy/gal then here are my three biggest takeaways:

1) On starting a conference: start small and scale up

Kelvin Newman Prisma imageA few new SEO/digital conferences have sprouted up in the UK in recent months, which is fine, but to aspiring conference organisers, Kelvin’s advice is to start small:

I’d always start with something small and then scale rather than launching big. If gives you a chance to test and learn and make mistakes when not very many people are watching. Think of your first event as an MVP.

I can relate to this, as I’m not sure where to take Cardiff SEO Meet at the moment (an all-dayer event does sound tempting…), but at the very least, it’s good to know that small beginnings are the sensible way to go anyway.

2) On hiring speakers: seek out speakers (not vice versa)

It’s very easy to simply accept the speakers who approach you as an organiser, but Kelvin’s method is different:

Keeping an eye on blog posts people are sharing is a key one but I love scouring through our attendee list and looking for people who might have a good perspective and then stalking them online a bit.

Only giving slots to people who put themselves forward can lead to only attracting certain kinds of speakers.

I like this as it naturally leads to a variety of speakers, and perhaps those who aren’t even ‘natural’ speakers. And there is the risk that the people that approach event organisers offering to speak and doing so all over the shop – not just for your event.

However, if you do approach Kelvin and ask to speak (which – to be fair – is how I got to speak at brightonSEO both times), at least have a talk idea at-the-ready:

In terms of pitching to speak, have a talk idea ready to go. Much easier for me to say yes to a interesting talk title than a vague “I’d like to talk”.

3) On what talks to have: some SEO topics are important, but variety is good

This is an interesting one as I’ve always admired Kelvin for booking non-SEO talks at an SEO event, or at least talks that closely align with SEO (such as UX, etc.). But it’s still really important to have some types of SEO talks:

People expect decent technical talks and link building talks. If we don’t programme those people won’t come back.

However Kelvin argues that some of the non-SEO talks are the ones that stay with people – the problem with SEO talks (as is the case with some elements of SEO) is that there’s a ‘here-today-gone-tomorrow’ feeling about them:

Talks from people like Dave [Trott] and Rory [Sutherland] are the kind that sit in the back of your mind for years to come, whereas the learning about the latest SERP feature you’ll use immediately but it’s value will go down over time.

Our job is to get the right mixture between the practical talks and the inspirational/theoretical ones. Which is something I know we and other events have been criticised for in the past.

Kelvin’s clearly not backing down with this way of thinking, given what’s coming up at next month’s event:

Got three different academics talking this time round about machine learning that might not be mass appeal but pretty sure will get a great receptions.


Read Kelvin’s AMA in full here!

If you’re going to brightonSEO April 2017 then let me know – I’ll be there. 🙂

[Image credit – my own creation using Prisma]

3 Events Down – What Cardiff SEO Meet Has Achieved So Far (& Future Plans)

Cardiff SEO Meet May crowd banner
After teasing the idea of running regular Cardiff SEO events this time last year, in March I introduced Cardiff SEO Meet. We had our first event in May, and we’ve run two more since then: one in August and one in November.

A while back in a post on State of Digital, I argued that running events is a good way to get inbound links, which can help on the SEO front. Running the event has been a good way to practice what I preach – and not only has it helped in gaining links, it’s helped in numerous other ways, too.

The benefits of running a local meetup

In this post I wanted to talk about what Cardiff SEO Meet has achieved so far (links or otherwise), and tease potential future plans…

It’s helped me to get links

When I launched the meetup, a couple of local publications covered it:

TD screenshot
In addition to linking to Cardiff SEO Meet’s Meetup group page, they linked to MOM (my freelance site) as well – a nice added bonus, which I wasn’t expecting. Even if they’d only linked to the former, it links to the latter, so I would’ve got some ‘link juice’ anyhow. But a direct link was even better.

At least I wasn’t talking rubbish in my StOD post eh? Hehe.

It’s helped me to meet potential clients

Another pleasant off-shoot of announcing the meetup: someone I knew at my office location (not a part of Welsh ICE, but based in the same building) got in touch saying that they saw me announce it, that they didn’t realise I was an SEO, and that they’d like to have a chat. So simply announcing the event got interest from a potential client. Nothing came of it immediately unfortunately, but we’ve kept in touch, so something could come of it in the future – “never say never,” as they say. They’re a pretty sizeable, £1M+ turnover business, so a nice client if it does come on-board.

It’s resulted in a potential shadowing/secondment opportunity

For a while now I’ve considered hiring staff and growing MOM into a full-on SEO agency. I’d been considering a few options – such as Jobs Growth Wales, GO Wales, etc. – when a low risk, dip-your-toe-in-the-water opportunity came up. One of the attendees of the first few meetups is a junior SEO working in-house for a local company, and he suggested shadowing me. It’s win-win: he learns more SEO tricks of the trade from a more experienced SEO (and takes that back to his employer), while I get a taste of being an employer. It’s still in-the-works but we’re hoping to work something out early next year.

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