Articles Tagged with SEO

The 1-Star Sucker-punch – Dropping the Ball on Online Reviews

Seeing stars imageAs SEOs we often have our focuses and our biases: our remit is to help improve clients’ visibility in search engines, after all.

However when working with SMEs in particular, you might be their go-to guy/girl for all their online marketing questions – not just SEO. I always try to offer help and advice on other areas if I can – such as social media and UX – but ultimately some things slip through the cracks. This post is an example where giving the client too much a focus can actually be a bad thing… They may perform one task really well, but then struggle to adjust strategy when it matters…

One of my clients has a big focus is on Local SEO: boosting the Map listing. If you Google “[keyword] [location]” keywords then oftentimes a Google Map shows up. And a big factor of that is getting positive Google reviews against the listing. We do pretty well all things considered, especially given that they’re not based in Cardiff city centre and instead operate on the edge of the city.

I did all the right stuff: I told them who was best to contact (happy clients) as well as the optimum time to contact them (just after a project had finished). I gave them an adaptable email template to use, containing info for the clients on how to leave a review and the appropriate links to the listing, etc. Over time, they hit the (ideal) minimum of five reviews and just kept going and going, eventually hitting more than ten 5-star reviews.

Click to read more!

It’s Taking 34 Weeks (& Counting) To Edit A Yahoo! Local Listing

Yahoo! thumbs-down imageIf you want to edit your Google My Business listing, you login (or claim access), make a change, submit it, and then it could take up to 3 days for the change to happen – but usually it’s almost instantaneous, if not within an hour or so.

If you want to edit your Yahoo! Local listing, …haha. Haha. Hahaha. HaHaHaHa. HAHAHAHA. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA! HA HA HA HA HA HA HA. Yeah, good luck with that.

In the UK it has to be done via Infoserve, and the official response is that it takes 8 weeks for a change to go through (which you find out after you’ve applied to edit a listing). That in itself is an embarrassment, so it’s pretty humiliating that – despite multiple attempts and 8-week waits – I’m still waiting for a change to go through for Computer Recruiter, my parents’ business.

14th May 2015 – I put in a request for an amendment of the listing as the postcode was incorrect, it was showing the company’s old web address, and the phone number was showing up as the fax number. An Infoserve employee (who shall remain nameless) dutifully replied informing me that it’d take 8 weeks and that it’d therefore be ready by 9th July 2015. I asked why it took so long (“8 weeks?!”) and got some nonsense reply about it being their standard process or whatnot.

Click to read more!

Getting Bulk PA Data for 404s with URL Profiler

I’ve been using URL Profiler on-and-off for a few months now, mainly for full-on link analysis – especially when it comes to penalty removal and disavow work. However, as I’m sure other folks have discovered, there’s a few other cheeky ways that the software can be put to good use. I found one, and after a chat with Patrick (one of URLP’s founders), I thought it’d be a good idea to throw it up as a quick blog post.

The challenge – 404orama!

I have a client who – despite only having a 1,000-page website – has over 5,000 404 (Page Not Found) errors associated with it. Over 5,000! (Pity it’s not over 9,000, otherwise I could use this. Anyhow…)

The number is so high due to a variety of reasons:

  • They’ve redesigned the site a few times in the past, which has included URL changes, but have never redirected old URLs to the new URLs,
  • A lot of random and/or duplicate URLs have been auto-generated due to a bug or two caused by their CMS system,
  • Simply due to pages being removed by the client’s internal teams (for archiving purposes) but not being redirected.

When you’re dealing with such a high quantity of 404s, it’s difficult to know where to start. My plan was to get PA (Page Authority) data on every URL, so that I could at least work through the list bit-by-bit starting with those with the most SEO value and therefore the most urgent to fix.

Enter URL Profiler. One of the many bits of data that it can grab is none other than PA. This gave me an idea…

The process

The process was dead simple. Instead of putting in a list of external URLs (as one might do when using it to conduct link analysis), I put in the whole list of 5k+ internal URLs, which was collated using a mix of Google Search Console data and a full-site Screaming Frog crawl.

I asked URLP to find PA data on all of them, let it run, and boom: PA data on 5k+ URLs. Sort from highest PA to lowest and that’s your priority order sorted.

URL Profiler results spreadsheet screenshot
The only problem? I now have the delightful task of figuring out where they should be redirected to. Hopefully chunks of them will follow patterns, and that I won’t need to run through all 5k+ individually(!), but either way – wish me luck…!

Have Your Cake & Optimise It Too – My Design Stuff Cardiff Talk

Design Stuff Cardiff logoOn Thursday 23rd July, I spoke at the 14th Design Stuff Cardiff event. My talk gave SEO advice aimed at the design community, covering SEO basics while advising on the SEO tactics that are most suited to designers: e.g. image SEO and link building tactics such as ‘web design by’ links, showcase websites and by finding non-credited images via reverse image search.

Here are the slides…

…And here is the video, which can also be watched on the DSC website:


At the end of the talk, Dan (DSC’s main organiser) asked the crowd if they’d learnt something new from my talk and virtually the whole room put their hand up, which was great to see. (Just don’t ask me how the book giveaway went…!)

I shared the stage that night with friend and fellow ICEr Warren Fauvel (@WarrenOF), who did an incredible talk about why design is doomed as it becomes more automated, and the ways that designers can adapt accordingly. I recommend watching it, whether you’re a designer, an SEO or if you work in another related creative/tech sector – it’s one of the best talks I’ve ever seen.

This has been my fourth speaking gig in as many months (actually, I’ve done five talks in four months, as I haven’t counted one smaller, more informal talk), with nothing else lined up now in the near future. To be completely honest though, I’m quite thankful to be taking a bit of a break from it, which will give me chance to concentrate on my SEO consultancy business as well as a few other side-projects that I’d like to work on. Stay tuned for some exciting news coming soon…

5 Ways That Bloggers Can Get Links Back To Their Blogs

This post is a repurposed HARO request – to find out more about this process, check out my post on State Of Digital all about it.

Linking diagramAs bloggers, we often get very fixated and carried away with our blogs: making sure that the content that we produce, the blog’s design, etc. are all absolutely perfect. SEO often enters the mix as well (in a do-it-yourself capacity), but it’s not simply a case of adding the WordPress SEO plugin – which is, admittedly, great – to your blog and thinking that that’s all you need to do on the SEO front…

On the contrary… On the link building (a.k.a. off-site SEO) side of things, the possibilities are endless and the fun never ends. It’s not a quantity game, but the more high quality, relevant and natural links that you get pointing to your website (or your blog, as is the case here), the better that it’ll perform from an SEO standpoint, resulting in a likely increase in visibility from organic search – i.e. when people are Googling content relevant to your blog, they might stand more of a chance of finding it, resulting in more traffic to it. So while you can tinker and tweak your site’s internal workings to improve its on-site SEO, you can also improve its off-site SEO by acquiring inbound links.

But how do you go about getting links? Where do you start?

As an SEO who’s also a keen blogger, here are a few ways of getting links back to your blog that have worked for me:

1) Guest blogging

StOD guest posting bio screenshot
Although this tactic has lost some of its impact due to people spamming it too much (although it’s not all bad – you can read my views here), there might still be some good opportunities to guest blog on other bloggers’ websites in your niche, so it’s worth looking into. In addition to the link back to your blog, the hosting blogger is likely to promote it via their social media profiles, too.

It’s worked for me. Beyond recently becoming a regular contributor on State Of Digital, I have also written posts for Moz, SEMrush and other industry blogs. In addition to getting some good industry exposure, getting links from such high profile websites to my blog has helped with its SEO.

2) Attending blogger meet-ups

Going to local blogger meet-ups simply to get to know other local bloggers and to offer advice can be a good way to get links. I’ve seen people get links because someone’s published a write-up of the event and they’ve included links to all the bloggers that they met there. I’ve even been added to a few bloggers’ blogrolls simply due to taking the time to get to know them.

Cardiff Blogs used to be the big player a few years back, but they run less events now than they used to. Despite this, there are a few blogging-related events that seem to crop up every now and again in the South Wales area – so it’s worth keeping an eye out.

Click to read more!